The Gifted? Gameshow, 31st October, Shoreditch Town Hall

Dear Friends,

Everyone has at least one special Gift don’t they? Can you tell when someone’s lying? Can you add up like Carol Vordeman? Can you name every manager in the Premiership? Are you so sexy you can raise the heart-rate of our (married) presenter by more than 5bpm?

On Thursday October 31st we’re hosting a groundbreaking new fundraising event for The Gifty Foundation called Gifted? It’s not a charity quiz night, it’s a full-on live gameshow spectacle with a mildly cheesy presenter, a pile of prizes (think Bullseye), trophies, and twelve teams of ten (you lot), battling it out after some free food and drink to become 2013’s Most Gifted. 

It’s going to be an evening of fun, foolishness and great generosity. You’ll be fed with incredible modern Ghanaian flavours courtesy renowned pop-up restaurant Zoe’s Ghana Kitchen.

You’ll be looked after by our hosts and most importantly, you’ll help us raise £20,000 we need to launch the first phase of The Gifty Foundation’s sickle cell education and testing programme in Ghana next year. 

TABLES / TEAMS OF TEN
If you know 9 other people that would make a good team, make yourself Team Captain and buy a table now. Get your credit card out and buy a table (£1000 through Paypal), then get your friends to pay you back.



SMALLER GROUPS
If you’re a smaller group, or on your own, buy individual tickets (£100 each, Paypal)  and we’ll match you up with some great team mates. 



DONATIONS
If you can’t come but would like to buy a ticket anyway, or if you want to buy a handful of tickets, please click here to make a specified donation through Paypal. 

Whatever you do, don’t leave it until the last minute to get your tickets, the auction event totally sold out in May and this will do too! Just reply to this email if you have any questions or you want to organise payment by another method. 

Thank you!

Tom, Jess, Kit, Muffin, Kwame, Helen, Joe & the whole Gifty Foundation team. 

Click here to add the event to your iCal, Outlook or Google Calendar
Check out the location on Google Maps

 

widwidthth

Sneak preview. Can you guess what this is all about?

Sneak preview. Can you guess what this is all about?

nprglobalhealth:

Sickle Cell Anemia Is On The Rise Worldwide
Sickle cell anemia may not be as well-known as say malaria, tuberculosis or AIDS. But every year, hundreds of thousands of babies around the world are born with this inherited blood disorder. And the numbers are expected to climb.
The number of sickle cell anemia cases is expected to increase about 30 percent globally by 2050, scientists said Tuesday in the journal PLOS Medicine. Countries in sub-Saharan Africa, where the disease is most common, will be the hardest hit.
A child gets sickle cell anemia by inheriting two copies of a defective gene, one from each parent. The mutations cause red blood cells to collapse and form a crescent moon-like shape. These so-called sickle cells clump together and can’t carry oxygen throughout the body.
Continue reading.
Photo illustration of normal red blood cells and sickled cells (purple) from the National Institutes of Health.

nprglobalhealth:

Sickle Cell Anemia Is On The Rise Worldwide

Sickle cell anemia may not be as well-known as say malaria, tuberculosis or AIDS. But every year, hundreds of thousands of babies around the world are born with this inherited blood disorder. And the numbers are expected to climb.

The number of sickle cell anemia cases is expected to increase about 30 percent globally by 2050, scientists said Tuesday in the journal PLOS Medicine. Countries in sub-Saharan Africa, where the disease is most common, will be the hardest hit.

A child gets sickle cell anemia by inheriting two copies of a defective gene, one from each parent. The mutations cause red blood cells to collapse and form a crescent moon-like shape. These so-called sickle cells clump together and can’t carry oxygen throughout the body.

Continue reading.

Photo illustration of normal red blood cells and sickled cells (purple) from the National Institutes of Health.

0hmeekah:

When you make PAIN look this Good it never Wears out

0hmeekah:

When you make PAIN look this Good it never Wears out

"Encourage your friend, partner , loved one, mentor, bosses, etc who live with Sickle Cell Disease, to step forward and pronounce their status - LOUD & PROUD! Help us ELIMINATE THE STIGMA! Sickle Cell Sufferers are not outcasts! We are just like you, we are strong men & women & children who can get the job done, just like any other one of you. We are smart and loving & nurturing , and God Loves US! Spread the word!"

Sandra Dee, Accra, Ghana. 

"…nuso ba…when a mother gives birth to a sickle cell person, it is believed that the mother did something wrong and river has punished her with that child."

Gifty Foundation Focus Groups, Ghana 2012-13.

"Under 20% of the 50+ young people we talked to across Ghana knew their sickle cell status. Approximately 25% of the population carry the genetic traits AS or AC (WHO)"

— Gifty Foundation Focus Groups, Ghana 2012-13. 

Tags: sickle cell

An Update

Dear Friends and Supporters,

You haven’t heard from us for a while, but we’ve been busy. Over a year has passed since we officially launched the Gifty Foundation at the Africa Centre in London so I felt it was about time we give you a little update on the work we’re doing. 

Over the course of the year we became a registered charity, established a board and then hired a research company in Ghana to run a series of focus groups across the country in order to gauge attitudes, awareness and knowledge of sickle cell. A few weeks ago, Helen Platt who coordinated the project for us, completed her report based on those interviews. The results are illuminating and concerning. There is scant knowledge and almost universal misunderstanding of how the condition works. Very few people know their genetic status meaning that some of them will have children with sickle cell without having been aware of the possibility. Given that this is arguably a bigger problem in Ghana than HIV, why sickle cell gets such low levels of attention and investment is still puzzling to me. 

One of the research insights was that those few people who knew about sickle cell and had tested to see if they carry the genetic trait, had done so because someone they trusted took the time to explain it to them. We’re now embarking on a pilot project which involves making a short film with a series of well known, respected people from sport, entertainment, even politics, who will explain the issue and encouraging young people to take a simple test. When shown in classrooms or community centres, we’re then giving them vouchers to take a free test. Counselling is then made available after testing for those who test positive for the trait. 

The aim is to measure the effectiveness of that approach, and to gauge what portion of people shown the film will take a test, and where they will choose to go for that test - clinic, pharmacy, community centre etc. 

Once the pilot is completed we hope the results will provide a business case for much greater investment from organisations like the World Heath Organisation, UN, the Ghanaian Government and corporate donors. We intend to roll out the programme regionally, then nationally, while simultaneously publishing our handbook for other organisations to use in their own countries. We’re going to ‘open source’ the results. 

In other good news, we’re having a fundraising event later in the year in London, and we’re aiming to use that money to make the film and do the pilot in December or January. The event is in the planning stages and already looking like a lot of fun, so stay tuned for an invite soon. 

I wanted to firstly thank you for your support and secondly ask that you keep supporting us. For the next year every penny counts and we’re grateful for anything you can give through the donate button on the right. 

Many thanks,

Tom McDonnell
Chairman, The Gifty Foundation

NYE folks. Go to http://www.giftyfoundation.org/tickets to get yours. 

NYE folks. Go to http://www.giftyfoundation.org/tickets to get yours. 

The URIKA team (Elorm and Aba pictured here) with Kwame and Tom from The Gifty Foundation. 
URIKA are working with us on our national Sickle Cell awareness research. We met up today at Labadi Beach Hotel to talk about the findings so far and started to work out the shape of the first pilot education and testing project, which we currently want to carry out in Takoradi. Stay tunes for the results later in the year. 

The URIKA team (Elorm and Aba pictured here) with Kwame and Tom from The Gifty Foundation. 

URIKA are working with us on our national Sickle Cell awareness research. We met up today at Labadi Beach Hotel to talk about the findings so far and started to work out the shape of the first pilot education and testing project, which we currently want to carry out in Takoradi. Stay tunes for the results later in the year.